Prayers and Mantras for Lord Rama

The Bhagavad Gita classifies devotees into four types: (I) artharthi, (II) aarta, (III) jigyasu, and (IV) jnani (7: 16). These basically include (I) a person who wishes to gain material blessings, (II) a person who requests divine help during difficult times, (III) a person who wishes to gain knowledge about God, and (IV) a person who is God-realized, respectively. From this classification, we can infer that human beings pray to God with four different objectives. Moreover, a devotee who belongs to Category I today may become a Category III devotee tomorrow. Alternatively, someone may be a member of both Category I and  Category II at the same time.

God has applauded devotees from Category IV in the Bhagavad Gita; their devotion generally involves nishkama (without desire; selfless) prayers. At the same time, God does understand, as the abovementioned classification itself suggests, that human beings in need may opt for sakama (with desire) prayers. There is nothing wrong in asking God for money or rescue from sorrow when needed, but we must try to add elements of selflessness in our prayers whenever possible by not requesting material blessings. As spiritual seekers, our long-term objectives should include nishkama bhakti (devotion), liberation from the universe, and proximity to God.

Given below are some prayers for Lord Rama (God).

  • The name of Rama itself is admired as one of the biggest mantras in mainstream Hinduism. If you are looking for a longer mantra, one famous mantra is given below:

Sri Rama Jai Rama Jai Jai Rama

You can also check out some mantras on this page of the Divine Life Society.

  • The verses (chaupai) given below are two of the most famous verses from the Ramacharitamanasa, written by Goswami Tulasidasa. These two verses, together, can be used as a prayer.

मंगल भवन अमंगल हारी | द्रवउ सो दसरथ अजिर बिहारी ||

mangal bhavan amangal haari | dravau sau dashratha ajir bihari ||

(Bal Kand 111-2B)

Applied Meaning: May Lord Rama (God), the abode of auspiciousness and the destroyer of inauspiciousness, who plays as a child in the courtyard of King Dashratha, bestow his grace on me.

दीन दयाल बिरिदु संभारी | हरहु नाथ मम संकट भारी ||

deen dayal biridu sambhari | harahu nath mama sankat bhari ||

(Sundar Kand 26-2B)

Applied Meaning: O Lord Rama (God), please recall your glory of bestowing compassion on the needy and please remove my burdensome crisis.

  • Sri Ramachandra Kripalu Bhaja Mana is a famous devotional poem from the Vinay Patrika by Goswami Tulasidasa. This can be used as a prayer.
  • You can recite the popular Sanskrit verses given below as a prayer.

Ramaya Ramabhadraya Ramachandraya Vedhase

Raghunathaye Nathaye Sitayah Pataye Namah

  • There is a prayer called Sri Rama Bhujangam, written by Adi Shankaracharya, on this page.
  • You can read a prayer called Ramashtakam, written by Maharishi Ved Vyas, on this page.

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Free eBook: Hanuman’s Adoration for Lord Rama

I have put together a free eBook (through Draft2Digital) that includes an English translation of the Hanuman Chalisa (with my notes added) from this blog and my summary of the Sundar Kand from the Ramayana. It is available at Nook, Kobo, and Scribd. The links are given below:

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When Krishna accepted Sudama’s rice

Sudama was a poor Brahmin who had been Lord Krishna’s classmate as a child. Following his schooling, Sudama spent most of his time in remembrance of the Lord. Because his family did not even have enough for food, once his wife asked him if he could visit Krishna’s palace to ask for some alms. Sudama accepted the proposal, not for the monetary gain, but for the darshan [1] of Krishna, the Supreme Being, that the visit would lead to. As soon as Sudama reached Krishna’s palace, Krishna, along with his queen Rukmini, started serving Sudama. Krishna gave the frail jiva [2] a hug and washed his feet.

After giving Sudama a majestic reception, Krishna inquired if Sudama had brought any gifts for Krishna. Sudama had brought some puffed rice for Krishna but hesitated to offer it to Krishna, the wealthiest amongst kings. Krishna, the knower of all, understood what was in Sudama’s mind. Krishna immediately grabbed the rice and ate some of it. Sudama was over-whelmed at how Krishna treated him, a weak jiva, in his palace. The love for Krishna in Sudama’s mind did not allow Sudama to ask Krishna for a monetary loan. Consequently, Sudama left the palace empty-handed. He was, in fact, pleased by not receiving any monetary gifts from Krishna, for this implied, in Sudama’s mind, that Krishna did not want Sudama to be trapped in materialism, according to the Srimad Bhagavat Purana.

As soon as Sudama reached home, Sudama was surprised to see that his hut had turned into a grand and luxiruious palace, and his family had been blessed with incomparable status, wealth, and servants. He at once understood that Krishna had blessed him with riches. The Srimad Bhagavat Purana says that when Krishna blesses his devotees, he does not inform them beforehand, for Krishna considers many of his blessings humble. On the other hand, when he receives a tiny gift, like fruits or rice, from an individual soul, he accepts it as an enormous offering because it is laden with devotion for him. Because Sudama was already saturated with love for Krishna, Sudama accepted all the material benefits that Krishna gave him but his mind never got attached to them and his love for Krishna increased progressively. This interaction between Sudama and Krishna supports Krishna’s statement in the Bhagavada Gita that Krishna accepts any gift that is offered with devotion (Bhagavad Gita 9.26).

[1] face-to-face meeting with God

[2] individual soul

This blog is back

After a gap of about five years, this blog is back with a new name — Hindu Routes to God.

In the process of migrating this blog from the previous web address, some of your comments may have been lost. Your comments are valuable to this blog; feel free to post new ones.

Edited on May 5, 2019.

Yogavasistha: Tandava and the dissolution

It is believed that Rudra, a form of Shiva, performs the Tandava dance with his Shakti when it is time for the dissolution of the universe. However, according to the Yogavasistha [1], this dance is a continuous process. Symbolizing the impermanence of the material world, the entire universe, where every single object is destructible, becomes the theatre for Tandava. The drying up of water bodies, destruction of the fourteen worlds, and the collapse of the stars – are all a part of Tandava.

Describing his own vision of a great dissolution from a kalpa [2] of the past, Rishi Vasistha, in this scripture, explains that the Tandava concluded when Rudra engulfed the entire universe as if it were a leaf. Rudra, beyond comprehension, then turned invisible, according to this book. As of the universe, nothing but absolute peace and consciousness remained, which is the true nature of Shiva [3].

[1] Note that the Yogavasistha supports the philosophy of Advaita Vedanta. Hinduism involves multiple philosophies, and alternate and more detailed descriptions about the universe’s dissolution can be found in other Hindu scriptures.

[2] aeon

[3] According to popular Hindu theories, following the dissolution of the universe, numerous abodes (loka) of God continue to exist, where beings live permanently with God.